Tyler Clementi's Death

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Often enough we talk about computerized accounting as the most wonderful thing for businesses. Many people wonder how they got by without it. Using software for accounting has become so common that only a few of us have considered the disadvantages of using computers to perform accounting tasks. However, those disadvantages do exist.Accounting systems are expensive not only to purchase, but also to maintain. Software changes and there may be new versions to purchase. Operating systems also change and they can be expensive, especially for a small business. If a computer stops working, then it needs to be fixed, incurring costs and delays in processing accounting information.

When getting a new accounting system, there is always time and energy spent in training. After a system is bought, then about every year new versions are released with changes that may need some extra training getting used to. Some folks are just not "computer people" and takes them lots of time to be able to use a system. Many times pencil and paper are just faster. Computerized accounting is dependent on machines and other software to work properly. Often enough if one thing is wrong with the computer, then there is no access to the software and work cannot be done. Then time and expense are involved in getting all the system and software up and running. But then, maybe the printer stops working. There are many inter-dependent pieces in this puzzle of a computerized accounting and reliance on it 100% of the time is not realistic.

His father, Ravi Pazhani, a slight man with metal-frame glasses, sat behind him. Some way to the right of Pazhani were Joseph and Jane Clementi. Jane Clementi, who has very straight bangs, wore a gold crucifix. She and her husband form a tall, pale, and formidable-looking couple. Their youngest son, Tyler, had died a year earlier, and the family’s tragedy was the silent focus of everyone in the room. That September, Tyler Clementi and Ravi were freshman roommates at Rutgers University, in a dormitory three miles from the courtroom. A few weeks into the semester, Ravi and another new student, Molly Wei, used a webcam to secretly watch Clementi in an embrace with a young man. Ravi gossiped about him on Twitter: “I saw him making out with a dude. Yay.” Two days later, Ravi tried to set up another viewing. The day after that, Clementi committed suicide by jumping from the George Washington Bridge.

Clementi’s death became an international news story, fusing parental anxieties about the hidden worlds of teen-age computing, teen-age sex, and teen-age unkindness. ABC News and others reported that a sex tape had been posted on the Internet. CNN claimed that Clementi’s room had “become a prison” to him in the days before his death. Next Media Animation, the Taiwanese company that turns tabloid stories into cartoons, depicted Ravi and Wei reeling from the sight of Clementi having sex under a blanket. Ellen DeGeneres declared that Clementi had been “outed as being gay on the Internet and he killed himself. Something must be done.”

Enraged online commentary called for life imprisonment for Ravi and Wei, and Ravi’s home address and phone number were published on Twitter. Ravi was called a tormenter and a murderer. Garden State Equality, a New Jersey gay-rights group, released a statement that read, in part, “We are sickened that anyone in our society, such as the students allegedly responsible for makingsurreptitious video, might consider destroying others’ lives as a sport.” Governor Chris Christie, of New Jersey, said, “I don’t know how those two folks are going to sleep at night, knowing that they contributed to driving that young man to that alternative.” Senator Frank Lautenberg and Representative Rush Holt, both from New Jersey, introduced the Tyler Clementi Higher Education Anti-Harassment Act. Clementi’s story also became linked to the It Gets Better project—an online collection of video monologues expressing solidarity...
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