Poetry and Emily Dickinson

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Jessica Lynch
Professor J. S. Ward
English 270
August 9, 2014
Individual Analysis: “I’m Nobody! Who are you?

Emily Dickinson wrote a masterpiece of a poem called, “I’m Nobody! Who are you?”. The simplicity of the poem is easy to understand and to articulate what the author is portraying. The theme of the poem would be that there are “nobodies” in this world because when you’re a “somebody” life would be difficult. Along with the theme there are a variety of literary elements that creates this poem to be intriguing. These elements include: diction, characterization, form, and the overall significance of the poem.

The understanding of the poem, “I’m Nobody! Who are you?” was simple. The author stated that one person was a “nobody”, which lead to a second person found who also shared the same “title” of nobody. As the poem continues, as a reader we start to see the form in which the poem is written. Emily Dickinson used a form in poetry that rhymes but doesn’t at the same time. Through rhyme the reader is able to see the correlation that she continues throughout.

The way in which the poem was written, leads the reader to an element called diction. There are some words in which are difficult to comprehend. For instance, the word bog is hardly ever used in the 21st Century. I was unfortunately not able to clearly define “bog” for myself using the internet; this mean there are various definitions that defines what a bog is. I assume it is sometime dreary since it is still defining what a “nobody” is. Diction can vary with everyone; it goes along with what a person already knows in life.

Since plot can also vary in poems, Emily Dickinson clearly had a meaning she wanted to point out to her readers. The plot of, “I’m Nobody! Who are you?” is written in the title. As we continue to dissect each line, we come to an understanding that the characters in the poem want to continue to be nobodies. The characters assumption of somebodies is that they’re public...
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