Backwards Planning Lessons

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Carol-Ann Dennis – Backward Planning Lessons 1-4 – Week 3

Title of Lesson 1: What is a chemical reaction?
Grade Levels: 7th grade
Standard: MS – PS1-2. – Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred. (examples = burning sugar or steel wool, fat reacting with sodium hydroxide, and mixing zinc with hydrogen chloride). Objectives: Students will be introduced to chemical reactions, reactants, and products and will build upon their knowledge of chemical versus physical changes. Essential Questions: How is a chemical change related to a chemical reaction? Estimated Time: 50 minutes

Materials: Steel wool, lighter, Triple-Bean Balance, Google Chromebooks, Science Interactive Journals 6E Learning Cycle Stages
Engage: Wearing goggles with the student’s only viewing, the steel wool will be weighed on the Triple-Beam Balance to begin with and students will record the weight in their Science Interactive Journals. The teacher will light the steel wool on fire, which reduces the steel wool’s weight since the materials are being oxidized into the air as ash. Following the demonstration the steel wool will be weighed again and students will record the data once again. Explore Through E-search: Students will search on the internet for other examples of chemical reactions and even find a video of the reaction that they just saw. Explain: Students will be asked to continue in their Science Interactive Journal explaining why the steel wool weighed less after the burning of it. Extend: Students would be asked to journal a fact that they already knew before class, a fact that they learned today, and an answer to the essential question. Literacy Component: Students could create their own chemical reaction and explain how it would work, even in an imaginary world. They would need to explain the change and how the reactants are different from the product.

Title of Lesson 2: How can you control the amount of products in a chemical reaction? Grade Levels: 7th grade
Standard: MS – PS1-2. – Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred. (examples = burning sugar or steel wool, fat reacting with sodium hydroxide, and mixing zinc with hydrogen chloride). Objectives: Students will build on their knowledge from Lesson 1 realizing that what you put into a reaction is going to go through a chemical change resulting in new substances. Essential Questions: How do reactants and products relate to each other? Estimated Time: 50 minutes

Materials: Chemical reaction cards (reactants, products, yield signs, plus signs), worksheets with reactions on them, and spaces for the students to balance chemical equations, Science Interactive Journals. 6E Learning Cycle Stages

Engage: Using the Promethean Board, place the reactants to a chemical equation on the board, draw the yield sign, and let the students write this down in their Science Interactive Journal. Ask them what the products will be? How do they know that they will be the products? What goes into making the products? Explore Through E-search: Using their chemical reaction cards, and the internet, students will learn the basics of balancing chemical equations. Explain: Students will work in pairs while researching and filling out their worksheets. Extend: Students would be asked to journal a fact that they already knew before class, a fact that they learned today, and answer to the essential question, and the balanced chemical equation from the beginning of class. Literacy: Create a graphic organizer to organize their information from class and explain in a paper how the reactants and products relate to each other.

Title of Lesson 3: How can you form a precipitate from a chemical reaction? Grade Levels: 7th grade
Standard: MS –...
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